Tips For Chapter 13 And Chapter 7 Personal Bankruptcy And Property

Bankruptcy is not in any way a quick fix for making poor financial decisions in the past. It is a decision that will affect your financial well-being for, at least, the next ten years. As such, the decision should not be taken lightly. Use the following tips to plan for the process and decide if it is truly, the only solution to your situation.

Don't charge up your credit cards knowing you are going to file bankruptcy, if you have already started the process or made recent purchases for luxury items. While this type of purchasing is still part of your "�debt,' it is likely that you'll still be responsible for repaying the money for those items. In most cases, what you are attempting to do is obvious.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you will have to do your best to build your credit all over again. Do not be tempted to allow your credit account to have nothing on it, so it will appear to be fresh. This will send a bad signal to anyone who is looking at it.


Evaluate your consultation with any lawyer by the way he or she handled the consult. Consider the length of your consult. If it lasted less than 15 minutes or it was with an assistant rather than an actual lawyer conducting the consult, this could signal that lawyer is probably not the best choice. You want someone that takes the time to handle your case personally, and you want to get your money's worth. You should also shy away from those lawyers who pressure you with phone calls or try convincing you immediately after a consultation by getting pushy.



Find out the real reason you are filing for bankruptcy. What happened in your life that brought you to this place? What do you need to do to make sure that you can move on? What actions do you need to take before you can be sure that this will never happen again?

Before you file for bankruptcy, make sure that you sort out your taxes. When you file, the bankruptcy trustee will need to see your tax return from last year and possibly even your tax return from two years ago. If you have these documents ready, your bankruptcy attorney will be able to ensure that the whole bankruptcy process is carried out as quickly as possible.

Remember that certain kinds of debt won't be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won't be able to add them in the future.

Think carefully before filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy. While Chapter 7 bankruptcy (irreversible insolvency) will effectively get rid of all your debts, allowing you to start afresh, it will also be on your credit report for 10 years. This will greatly reduce your chances of getting any type of credit in the future. Consult with a bankruptcy attorney - he or she may be able to suggest a different form of debt relief that won't have such a damaging effect on your credit.

If you lose your job, or otherwise face a financial crisis after filing Chapter 13, contact your trustee immediately. If you don't pay your Chapter 13 payment on time, your trustee can request that your bankruptcy be dismissed. You may need to modify your Chapter 13 plan if, you are unable to pay the agreed-upon amount.

Do not wait too long to file for bankruptcy, if that is what you are going to do. By waiting a long period of time, you are just allowing your debt to keep piling up. Once you can find out more have decided that filing for bankruptcy is the right choice, start the process right away!

Do not cosign on any type of loan during or after your bankruptcy. Because you cannot file for bankruptcy again for many years, you will be on the hook for the debt if the person for whom you are cosigning is unable to meet his or her financial obligation. You must do whatever you can to keep your record clean.

Clean up your credit record after ten years. When you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, it remains on your credit report for ten years. However, the credit bureaus are not required to remove the information. In order to get rid of the bankruptcy record, write a letter to the credit reporting agencies, along with a copy of your discharge notice. Follow this up with a phone call to make sure that they have removed the bankruptcy record.

Do not cosign on any type of loan during or after your bankruptcy. Because you cannot file for bankruptcy again for many years, you will be on the hook for the debt if the person for whom you are cosigning is unable to meet his or her financial obligation. You must do whatever you can to keep your record clean.

Be aware that there are two kinds of bankruptcy. There is Chapter 7, and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 can keep the filer from paying debts entirely. This option is generally for those that have debts so high or income that is so low that, they cannot afford a payment plan. Chapter 13 lets the filer get a payment plan so that they can repay all, or parts of their debt between three and five years.

Research the rules and regulations of personal bankruptcy before you file. There are many laws which govern bankruptcy; therefore, to protect your bankruptcy case, know the rules. Some mistakes in your papers can cause your case to be dismissed. Before you begin bankruptcy proceedings, research as much as you can. If you take care of this now, you can avoid problems going forward.

If you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy only to find that you are not qualified to use the homestead exemption, you might be able to put place your mortgage in a Chapter 13 case. In some situations it might be better if you convert the whole Chapter 7 bankruptcy into Chapter 13. In this case, you should consult with your attorney to decide on your next step.

Be certain to create a list that displays all the debts you want discharged when you file. If you posses debts that aren't listed in the paperwork, they wont be included in your discharge. It is up to you to ensure that all important information is there, so all debts are discharged.

Always be http://www.businessinsider.com/what-happens-when-you-default-on-student-loans-2016-2 in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

Hopefully, you have learned what you need to know about personal bankruptcy. The advice that has been gathered into this article is meant to help you make the right choices when the time comes to file or to help you decide if it is the right move for you to make. Use this as a guide to help decide.

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